NEWS IN BRIEF

De Montfort students win educational US trip

A team of four award-winning De Montfort University law students are off to the US to learn more about the origins of &#39street law&#39. The group, which won £7,500 in a competition for a street law for children project, plans to spend time at Washington&#39s Georgetown University and New York&#39s City University to learn more about the US approach to street law.

Trainee salaries continue to rise

Trainee salaries have grown over the past year, despite a slowdown in the number of legal graduate vacancies. The GTI&#39s graduate recruitment trends survey shows that 52 per cent of firms paid trainees more than £25,000 in 2002, compared with 33 per cent in 2001 and 4 per cent in 2000. However, the survey found that the number of vacation placements is at its lowest for four years.

Herbert Smith and Cambridge Uni join forces

Herbert Smith is funding an international visitors programme at Cambridge University to introduce law students to members of the present and future legal community. Legal academics and practitioners from across the world will be invited to spend around three months at the university to take part in seminars and lectures.

High Court rejects ECJ Arsenal trademark ruling

A London street trader has won the right to sell unofficial Arsenal FC merchandise after High Court judge Mr Justice Laddie overturned a European Court of Justice (ECJ) ruling. The judge rejected the ECJ&#39s decision as he felt the court had acted outside its powers by making fresh findings of fact. Arsenal plans to appeal.

Oxford Uni creates human rights masters degree

Oxford University has launched a part-time masters degree for junior lawyers interested in human rights. An agreement between Oxford, the Soros Foundation and the Foreign Office, means lawyers from Herzegovinia and Serbia are now able to join. The masters degree in international human rights law is taught online by Oxford tutors and other institutions and students also have access to the Bodleian Library.

Downing College sets up £1m appeal

Downing College Cambridge is calling on its ex-lawyers to contribute towards a fellowship fund worth £1m to support academic activity. The Hopkins-Parry Fellowship Appeal has been set up in recognition of the “exceptional teaching” by John Hopkins and Professor Clive Parry over the past 56 years. For more details call 01223 334850.

Creditors despair as Enron&#39s legal fees soar

Lawyers&#39 fees related to the Enron bankruptcy proceedings continue to snowball, sparking fears of dwindling returns for the creditors that are owed money by the defunct energy trader. The cost of the 23 firms acting for Enron and unsecured creditors has now reached a whopping $174m (£108.4m), with Enron&#39s lead adviser Weil Gotshal & Manges notching up $53.5m (£33.3m).

Clarification

In the December issue of Lawyer 2B it was incorrectly stated that the new vice-chair of the Trainee Solicitor&#39s Group, Genevieve Monclin, was a first-year trainee at Clyde & Co. Monclin does have a training contract with the firm but is presently completing her LPC.